Clone (Trick-Link) Rig

Clone (Trick-Link) Rig

Step 1. The Clone can be tied with all sorts of monofilamants, but our current favourite is our excellent Trick-Link material - made for the job...

Step 1. The Clone can be tied with all sorts of monofilamants, but our current favourite is our excellent Trick-Link material – made for the job…

Step 2. There are two patterns of hooks in the Gardner range suited to use in the Clone rig - the Covert Incizor or the Chod Hook. We favour the straight eyed Incizor.

Step 2. There are two patterns of hooks in the Gardner range suited to use in the Clone rig – the Covert Incizor or the Chod Hook. We favour the straight eyed Incizor.

Step 3. All you need to do is tie the hook on using a simple (reliable) knotless knot.

Step 3. All you need to do is tie the hook on using a simple (reliable) knotless knot.

Step 4. The finished knot should look like this, with between 6 and 8 wraps neatly abutted and the hooklink exiting the inside of the hook eye.

Step 4. The finished knot should look like this, with between 6 and 8 wraps neatly abutted and the hooklink exiting the inside of the hook eye.

Step 5. Thread a large Covert Rig Ring onto the tag left from the knotless knot. You will attach your hookbait to this rig ring later.

Step 5.  Thread a large Covert Rig Ring onto the tag left from the knotless knot. You will attach your hookbait to this rig ring later.

Step 6. Create a

Step 6. Create a ‘D’ in the monofilament by passing it back through the eye of the hook and ‘blobbing’ the end with a lighter. Take care not to burn or damage the hooklink or the knot itself.

Step 7. The hook and

Step 7. The hook and ‘D’ should look a little like this. A nice tidy D that sits squarely on the back of the hook shank. If its twisted (after pulling the knot tight) simply turn it so it is.

Step 8. We favour a Non Slip loop knot at the lead end of the hooklink as it offers a little more free movement to the hook bait when it

Step 8. We favour a Non Slip loop knot at the lead end of the hooklink as it offers a little more  free movement to the hook bait when it’s inhaled by feeding carp. Start with an overhand knot.

Step 9. create a loop and pass the tag end through the overhand knot in the opposite direction and finish off with a blood knot (tag passed through original overhand and tightened using tag only).

Step 9. create a loop and pass the tag end through the overhand knot in the opposite direction and finish off with a blood knot (tag passed through original overhand and tightened using tag only).

Step 10. You should be left with a really nice loop knot like the one shown (if the loop twists you have pulled on the loop whilst tightening down). Trim off the tag 2-3mm from the knot.

Step 10. You should be left with a really nice loop knot like the one shown (if the loop twists you have pulled on the loop whilst tightening down). Trim off the tag 2-3mm from the knot.

Step 11. Use your nails to sheath the knot and hooklink and carefully blob the tag of the loop knot. This secures the knot in the event of you applying very heavy pressure.

Step 11. Use your nails to sheath the knot and hooklink and carefully blob the tag of the loop knot. This secures the knot  in the event of you applying very heavy pressure

The finished rig. If you use a slow (balanced) sinking hookbait the rig will always lay out nicely and reset if a fish samples it.

The finished rig. If you use a slow (balanced) sinking hookbait the rig will always lay out nicely and reset if a fish samples it.

September 15th, 2015|Categories: Carp Rig Tying, Rig Tying|0 Comments

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